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Showing Articles with Tag: University of Adelaide






Oct 20, 2014

From PhD to Project Leader

Deborah Furst commenced research for the Goyder Institute in 2010 as PhD student with the University of Adelaide, investigating the patterns and processes across the Chowilla Floodplain and adjacent River Murray during flood. Read More







Sep 2, 2013

Investigating better solutions for improved stormwater management

Goyder Institute PhD Candidate, Michael Di Matteo, from the University of Adelaide’s School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering is currently investigating decision support methods to generate better solutions for the management of complex stormwater systems through the use of multipleobjective computer optimization guided by engineering intuition and judgment. Read More













Dec 12, 2017

Goyder Institute research in full swing as 2017 comes to an end

This year has seen Goyder Institute research taken to the sky and the mangroves as part of the Coastal Carbon Opportunities: demonstrating additionality and potential for future offsets in South Australia project led by Professor Bronwyn Gillanders of the University of Adelaide. Read More









Aug 23, 2018

New tools developed to help improve water security in the face of climate change

Goyder Institute researchers have developed new tools to help planners and policy-makers assess the impact of climate change on water resource systems and guide adaption planning. The tools address a significant knowledge gap – how to best use climate projections to modify or augment a system’s design to improve its resilience in a changing hydroclimate. Read More



Sep 27, 2018

Halfway point for Coastal Carbon Opportunities project

The Coastal Carbon Opportunities project is among the first to research climate change mitigation in coastal systems. The Goyder Institute for Water Research team, led by Professor Bronwyn Gillanders (University of Adelaide), are investigating the potential of South Australian coastal ecosystems (seagrass, mangrove and saltmarsh) for carbon sequestration and storage. Read More